Book Reviews

July 19th, 2008

 

   

 

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 2009 Book Reviews

Literacy

 Reading Strategies for Elementary Students with Learning Difficulties: Strategies for RTI, 2nd edition, is written by William Bender and Martha Larkin.  The authors cite brain research as they develop their points. There are reflective exercises that will guide thinking. Two chapters explain phonics, others on building vocabulary and strategies for gaining comprehension. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412960694 (pb). 9781412960687 (hc) 

 No Limits to Literacy for Preschool English Learners, written by Theresa Roberts, has helpful Preschool English Learners boxes that summarize the teaching principles that are explained in greater detail on the page. There are fun suggestions such as using different colored unifix cubes to represent sounds. Curriculum issues and family connections are addressed in different chapters. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412965644 (pb). 9781412965637 (hc).

 Promoting Reading for Pleasure in the Primary School by Michael Lockwood makes the case that if we don’t help students enjoy reading they won’t be lifelong readers. The British research, based on 4,000 students, provides page after page of case studies and shares teachers’ enthusiastic activities. There are suggestions for ages 5-12 with a chapter devoted to boys. The last chapter suggests books for 5-7, 7-9 and 9-11 year olds. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412929677 (pb). 9781412929660 (hc).

 Building the Reading Brain, PreK-3 was written by Pamela Nevills and Patricia Wolfe. This second edition is filled with recent research on the developing brain. Chapters are excellent – what happens in the brain when children read words, birth to age 3, preschool years, readers at risk, and more. The conclusion restates twelve points. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412963268 (pb). 978141296325 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

Best Practices for Teaching Reading: What Award-Winning Classroom Teachers Do is by Randi Stone with examples by elementary and secondary teachers across the country. There are 40 strategies covering all academic subjects and focusing on diverse needs. Chapter 2 presents “Ten Steps to Great Readers,” although brief has excellent ideas. Other chapters cover visual arts, reading kinesthetically, autism issues and differentiating instruction. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412924597 (pb). 9781412924580 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Improving Literacy Instruction with Classroom Research by Theresa A. Deeney teaches the steps for classroom research, beginning with being a good observer, collecting data and keeping a journal of reflections. It provides research on each of five core skills in reading literacy, plus many examples of teacher research projects. There are many charts, guidelines and tables. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 97814129408949 (pb). 9781412940887 (hc).

 English Grammar Instruction That Works: Developing Language Skills for All Learners written by Evelyn and Andrew Rothstein provides K-12 activities to develop a deep understanding of our language. Parts of speech, syntax and semantics, roots of words and more are presented for teachers’ review with teaching ideas. Each chapter provides Internet sites. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412959490 (pb). 9781412959483 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction, edited by Bob Algozzine, Dorothy J. O’Shea and Festus E. Obiakor, deals with all areas of reading comprehension with multi-cultural literature themes. Tables summarize paragraphs and numerous stories of students emphasize important points. The 7 chapters cover all areas of literacy development. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957748 (pb). 9781412957731 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Writing Instruction for English Learners: A Focus on Genre by Eugenia Mora-Flores helps teachers understand the needs of English language learners. Students are taught to plan, write, revise, sharing and editing once again before producing a final draft. There are many visuals and examples. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957298 (pb). 9781412957281 (hc).

 Marc Levitt, author of Putting Everyday Life on the Page: Inspiring Students to Write, Grades 2-7, provides strong writing prompts and examples. Chapters develop ideas for teaching metaphors, developing character, and writing across all curriculum and teaching grammar. This light-hearted book gives suggestions for games while teaching important principles of writing. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412965323 (pb). 9781412965316 (hc).

Leadership  

Promoting Your School: Going Beyond PR, 3rd ed. is written by Carolyn Warner. This book will be valuable to all levels of educators and school environments. The 13 chapters explain how to create a marketing plan, all kinds of communication, the best of more recent practices (interdisciplinary, MI. cooperative, etc.) along with data gathering and crisis management. Each chapter concludes with further suggested readings. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412958134 (pb). 9781412958127 (hc).

 Kay Psencik has written Accelerating Student and Staff Learning: Purposeful Curriculum Collaboration to help teachers become more skilled as they create school-based curriculum tied to standards. Each chapter begins with assumptions and ends with a summary, reflective questions and extended learning opportunities. This would be an excellent book for team discussions and creating Professional Learning Communities. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412971461 (pb). 9781412971454 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Leading with Passion and Knowledge: The Principal as Action Researcher is written by Nancy Fichtman Dana. It helps principals develop a questionnaire and guides the teachers to collect data and discuss the results for their school. Areas addressed include staff development, curriculum development, leadership skills, relationships with teachers and students, plus building culture, manage and social justice. There are nine strategies for collecting data. I was particularly impressed with the guidelines on PowerPoint presentations. Corwin/Sage. 9781412967051(pb). 9781412967044 (hc)

 Talk About Teaching! Leading Professional Conversations was written by Charlotte Danielson to guide educational leaders in nurturing teachers’ continued learning. Some teachers could feel threatened when a principal wants to talk. Informal professional conversations can be a normal part of each week, according to Danielson. The eight chapters provide practical insights to encourage professional conversation in your school. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412941419 (pb). 9781412941402 (hc).

 Getting It Right From the Start: The Principal’s Guide to Early Childhood Education by Marjorie J. Kostelnik and Marilyn L. Grady blends research with practical applications for early childhood education. The authors begin by explaining why preschoolers in poverty, without the advantage of early education, end up as crime prone adults with fewer opportunities for job success. Supervisors are given examples of quality programs and how to give staff feedback. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412949507 (pb). 9781412949491 (hc).

 The Block Scheduling Handbook, 2nd ed., by J. Allen Queen covers all grade levels and discusses the benefits of many teachers knowing students. Beginning with research and teachers’ resistance to change he continues with a focus on the senior high school. Then he writes about developmental issues of early childhood through adolescence, then middle and elementary schools. Other chapters deal with aligning standards, many effective strategies and assessments are included. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412963015 (pb). 9781412963008 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 The 2nd edition of Mindful Leadership: A Brain-Based Framework was written by Michael Dickmann and Nancy Stanford-Blair. This book focuses on the mind-body connection. There are articles on social relationships, emotion, reflection and how to expedite the construction of knowledge in order to create brain compatible leadership. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412964104 (pb). 9781412964098 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Leading Curriculum Development by Jon Wiles explains the necessity of having a curriculum team that regularly evaluates curriculum. Students’ needs change, new technologies are available and communities demand different ideas. Every administrator should have a team to reflect on short and long-term goals. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412961417 (pb). 9781412961400 (hc).

 Beginning Teachers  

Teach Well, Live Well: Strategies for Success, written by John Luckner and Suzanne Rudolph, is designed for the beginning teacher. Chapter one is about organizing your life and classroom so you are ready for students. Chapter two includes brain-based learning principles, thinking skills, multiple intelligences and more. The next chapters deal with teaching the whole student, assessment, collaborating and ends with a chapter of taking care of yourself. The chapters are highlighted with quotes and interesting bottom line boxes.  Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412955768 (pb). 9781412955751 (hc).

 The Exceptional Teacher’s Handbook: The First-Year Special Education Teacher’s Guide to Success was written by Carla Shelton and Alice Pollingue. Each chapter begins by explaining strategies then provides numerous forms to use in the process of determining what to do next. Chapters range from managing the classroom to parent conferences. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969147 (pb). 9781412969130 (hc).

Special Education  

 RTI Assessment Essentials for Struggling Learners, by John Hoover, develops three assessment types: universal screening, progress monitoring, and diagnostic assessment for special education. Each chapter ends with a summary and checklists. This will be an important book for anyone with struggling learners. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969543 (pb). 9781412969536 (hc).

 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Interventions and Treatments for Children and Youth by Richard L. Simpson and others is one of two new books on autism. The first chapter focuses on interpersonal interventions such as “gentle teaching,” which should be in all classrooms. Other chapters cover skill-based, cognitive, and biological interventions. It reviews research and explains many programs. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412906036 (pb).

 The Educator’s Guide to Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders, written by Josefa Ben-Arieh and Helen J. Miller, begins with assessment. It continues with objectives, implementing inventions and environmental supports, including all senses. Later chapters deal with the preverbal student, the nonverbal student and issues at recess and physical education. There are eleven charts to use for understanding resources. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957762 (pb). 9781412957755 (hc).

 Before the Special Education Referral: Leading Intervention Teams was written Matthew Jennings. The author presents a four-phase model for developing and evaluating effective pre-referral interventions for struggling students. After being introduced to a fictional principal/teacher, recent research is discussed in relation different situations. There are reproducible tools and continual examples as the team looks at the needs of students. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966917 (pb).  9781412966900 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 The Teacher’s Concise Guide to Functional Behavioral Assessment by Raymond J. Walker writes, “Because every behavior has a reason behind it…” Too many teachers go through college and learn how to teach a subject but not how to teach students with behavioral difficulties, yet if you can’t reach these students they will not learn. The strength of this book is the many examples to help teachers identify strategies for all students’ success. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966054 (pb). 9781412966047 (hc).

 The Special Educator’s Reflective Calendar and Planning Journal: Motivation, Inspiration, and Affirmation was written by Mary Zabolio McGrath and Beverley Holden Johns. September begins by building team rapport and learning about students. October focuses on working with parents. Each day’s ideas are recorded in a reflective journal. Entries can be in the book or teachers may use their own journal by first summarizing the month’s ideas, then recording their own thoughts and actions. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412965361 (pb)

 The General Educator’s Guide to Special Education, 3rd ed. by Jody Maanum begins by discussing the 13 categories of disabilities then explains the many varieties of special education assessment. Chapter 3 deals with accommodations and modifications, with the next chapter focuses on intervention strategies. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412971379 (pb). 9781412971362 (hc).

 Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities by Lucy Martin covers K-12 and special education classrooms. There are more than 100 practical strategies as well as examples of the author’s own classroom experiences. There are test-taking strategies in every content area including music. Each chapter ends in a summary. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412968034 (pb). Kindle ed. available.

 Igniting Creativity in Gifted Learners, K-6: Strategies for Every Teacher by Joan Franklin Smutny and S.E. von Fremd has different chapters for each content area with input from many teachers across the country. It is rich with print and web resources. The final chapter “Discovering Your Own Creativity” has research background and many ideas for fostering a teacher’s creativity. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957786 (pb). 9781412957779 (hc).

Instruction

 What Successful Teachers Do: 101 Research-Based Classroom Strategies for New and Veteran Teachers, 2nd ed. by Neal Glasgow and Cathy Hicks is divided into 9 sections: Collaborating with students, organizing your curriculum while managing time and environment are two of the sections. There are guidelines for using the Internet, types of literacy, working with parents and discovering your teaching styles. Chapters begin with “what research says” about a strategy such as “Use different motivational strategies for boys and girls.” There are suggestions for classroom applications. I am very impressed with this book! Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966191 (pb). 9781412966184 (hc).

 Timothy Gangwer has written the 2nd edition of Visual Impact, Visual Teaching: Using Images to Strengthen Learning. After defining visual teaching in the 1st chapter the author writes twenty pages about brain-compatible learning. Then chapters cover visual links in all subjects including math, in addition to creative writing, mnemonics, music, dance, peer teaching and problem solving. The full color pictures are wonderfully refreshing. There are 409 activities to help any teacher integrate better visual thinking. More brain space is dedicated to visual thinking that language. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412968294 (pb). 9781412968287 (hc).

 Lesson Design for Differentiated Instruction, Grades 4-9 written by Kathy Tuchman Glass, guides teachers through the necessary process of helping students learn according to their different needs. She deals with standards, assessment and lesson planning for the differentiated classroom. Chapters are full of sample classroom activities. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412959827 (pb). 9781412959810 (hc).

 Problem Solving in Mathematics, Grades 3-6: Powerful Strategies to Deepen Understanding was written by Alfred S. Posamentier and Stephen Krulik. Chapters focus on nine strategies encouraging teachers to create their own sets of problem cards starting with the authors’ examples. The chapters are about organizing data, intelligent guessing & testing, solving simpler but equivalent, acting it out, working backwards, find the pattern, logical reasoning, making a drawing and adopting a different point of view. After introducing a problem there are chapter teaching notes and numerous problems for students. This is a well organized and helpful book. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412960670 (pb). 9781412960663 (hc).

 William Bender wrote the 2nd edition of Differentiating Math Instruction: Strategies That Work for K-8 Classrooms. It begins with brain research and multiple intelligences. He writes about the problems of direct instruction in large classrooms and provides models for differentiating. Chapters focus on deep conceptual understanding and learning strategies. It is a practical book. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412970822 (pb).  9781412970815 (hc).

 Secrets to Success for Science Teachers, written by Ellen Kottler and Victoria Brookhart Costa, is filled with practical ideas and strategies. The first chapter is entitled “Design Your Classroom to Create Communities of Learners.” Further chapters refer to standards, deep understanding, connecting to students, developing science literacy, using technology and powerful activities. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966269 (pb). 9781412966252 (hc).

 The Power of Talk: How Words Change Our Lives by Felecia Briscoe, Gilberto Arriaza and Rosemary Henze is filled with my post-it notes. The introduction states readers will better understand how language perpetuates social inequities or can interrupt them. There are examples, strategies and activities. This book would be useful for a school book group and also in colleges of education to help teachers realize their language is related to social justice. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412956024 (pb). 9781412956017 (hc).

 Teaching U.S. History Beyond the Textbook: Six Investigative Strategies, Grades 5-12,
written by Yohuru Rashied Williams, has a wealth of creative ideas for critical thinking. The first chapter is entitled “Haunted History: Revealing the Hidden Past.” The second chapter explains the “CSI Approach: Making Students Detectives.” Another chapter deals with court cases. Each chapter has questions for review and reflection and additional resources. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966214 (pb). 9781412966207 (hc).

 The Primary Drama Handbook by Patrice Baldwin argues the need for drama to enhance children’s self-esteem and practical skills. There are eight well developed units plus many ideas for you to create your own dramas as you become more comfortable. I was particularly impressed with The Great Fire of London because of the depth of the activities and understanding. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412929653 (pb).  9781412929646 (hc).

 The 3rd edition of The Curriculum Bridge: From Standards to Actual Classroom Practice was written by Pearl Solomon. How do you translate standards to instruction while meeting students’ learning needs? The author answers this question with research and plans for staff development in best teaching practices. Each chapter begins with an introduction and ends with summary notes. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969840 (pb). 9781412969833 (hc).

 Becoming a Legendary Teacher: To Instruct and Inspire by William Freeman and David Scheidecker could be used in a school discussion or university classes. The authors want teachers to recognize their own talents to further motivate students to greater success. Part of their definition is that students remember legendary teachers years later. There are appendices with practical advice and homework points. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412954815 (pb). 9781412954808 (hc).

 Teaching for Wisdom, Intelligence, Creativity, and Success was written by Robert Sternberg, Linda Jarvin and Elena Grigorenko. They refer to the process as WICS. The guidelines inform teachers how to teach all abilities along with creative and practical skills. Part 2 deals with enhancing memory, analytical, practical and creative skills in all subjects of middle school. The next part is on assessment and finally “Why and How to Teach for Wisdom.” There are many activities, examples and tables. It is easy to read. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412964531 (pb). 9781412964524 (hc).

 Teaching How to Learn: The Teacher’s Guide to Student Success by Kenneth Kiewra focuses on the SOAR approach for K-12 students. That means teaching students learning strategies by Selecting key ideas; Organizing information using charts; Associating ideas for meaningful connections and Reinforcing learning through practice. Corwin/Sage, 2008. 9781412965347 (pb). 9781412965330 (hc).

 Fostering Learner Independence: An Essential Guide for K-6 Educators by Roxann Rose-Duckworth and Karin Ramer, identifies the classroom practices that hinder independence and those that foster self-sufficiency. The authors guide teachers in ways to strengthen students’ critical thinking, resiliency, self-motivation and problem solving. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966078 (pb). 9781412966061 (hc).

 Action-Packed Classrooms, K-5: Using Movement Educate and Invigorate Learners, 2nd ed. was written by Cathie Summerford with the forward by John Ratey, author of Spark: the Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. There is a lot of research connecting good learning with movement, yet many schools are eliminating recess and physical education to spend more time on academics. I loved this book because I can’t sit still for more than 30 minutes. There are so many great ideas that just take a few minutes to renew your students’ brains. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412970914 (pb). 9781412970907 (hc).

 The 2nd edition of 200+ Active Learning Strategies and Projects for Engaging Students’ Multiple Intelligences was written by James Bellanca. It has 25 activities for each of the 8 intelligences using the three-story intellect concept – gather, progress and apply. Pages clearly identify the appropriate level, what you need and directions. There are many graphic visuals. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412968850 (pb). 9781412968843 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Fierce Teaching: Purpose, Passion, and What Matters Most was written by long time “brainy” writer Eric Jensen. These 100 pages review core brain-friendly strategies. This book is nicely formatted with focus boxes, many visuals and research references. The seven strategies are clearly presented and there is an excellent summary epilogue. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412963305 (pb). 9781412963299 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 The 2nd edition of 12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action: Developing Executive Functions of the Human Brain was written by well-known Renata Numella Caine and Geoffrey Caine with Carol McClintic and Karl Klimek. The traditional points are handled in different chapters: relaxed alertness, learning without threats, social atmosphere, emotions, meaning, complex experiences, patterning and much more. Caine and Caine have been leaders for over twenty years. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412961073 (pb).  9781412961066 (hc).

 Bob Algozzine, Pam Campbell and Adam Wang have written 63 Tactics for Teaching Diverse Learners for 6-12th grades. It is divided into four parts – planning, managing, delivering and evaluating instruction. Too often secondary teachers have trained only in their subject areas and have little background in classroom management with diverse students in all curriculum areas. This would be an excellent book for new secondary teachers. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412942423 (pb). 9781412942416 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

Curriculum, Assessment and Student Performance

 The 2nd edition of Test Success in the Brain-Compatible Classroom was written by Carolyn Chapman and Rita King. They write about test preparation suggestions made by 12 top brain-in-education writers including Howard Gardner and Robert Sylwester. One long chapter discusses how to prepare students for tests. I felt the ideas were excellent. Other chapters include setting the environment and test-taking strategies. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969994 (pb). 9781412969987 (hc).

 Winning Strategies for Test Taking, Grades 3-8: A Practical Guide for Teaching Test Preparation is written by Linda Denstaedt, Judy Cova Kelly and  Kathleen Kryza. This book guides teachers to give students the skills to be confident learners and test takers. Chapters include question-answering strategies, constructed response questions and writing to a prompt. Chapters have TIME-OUT boxes asking teachers to reflect. There are many samples and interesting “Game Plan Practice Sessions.” Test taking has become an important skill. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412967037 (pb). 9781412967020 (hc).

 Developing Performance-Based Assessments, Grades K-5 is another of Nancy Gallavan’s books. In the introduction she writes, “Effective learning and teaching do not just happen by accident.” There is information about formative and summative assessments as they relate to students’ performance and rubrics to give students clear feedback. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412966092 (pb). 9781412966085 (hc).

 Developing Performance-Based Assessments, Grades 6-12 by Nancy Gallavan will help teachers gather baseline data then gather formative assessment data. The book includes demonstrations of how to create rubrics and summative assessments of data. There are checklists, graphic organizers, and activities. I particularly liked the five A’s for excellent assessment: academic rigor, active learning, authenticity, alternatives and achievement. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969819 (pb). 9781412969802 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 I’m very impressed with 2 Million Children: Success for All written by Robert E. Slavin, Nancy A. Madden, Bette Chambers and Barbara Haxby. The almost 400 pages of this large paperback have chapters on early childhood issues, reading for beginners, intermediate and middle school students. The authors write about tutoring programs, writing and math projects, family interaction and research as well as the importance of linking concepts with themes. I have many post-it notes throughout this valuable book. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412953085 (pb). 9781412953078 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Inclusion Strategies for Young Children: A Resource Guide for Teachers, Child Care Providers, and Parents, 2nd ed. was written by Lorraine O. Moore, who has a doctorate in educational psychology and has taught from elementary through college level. “Young children need to experience an environment within which they are loved and supported for who they are.” I would simply amend this to say all children need this. All of us want to feel included. This child-centered book provides 379 strategies for developing emotional, social, motor development and teacher assessment. The author begins and ends with brain research in addition to 19 forms for teacher reflection. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412971089 (pb). 9781412971072 (hc.)

 The Upper Elementary Years: Ensuring Success in Grades 3-6 by Christine Finnan helps teachers to understand child development based on comprehensive research and relevant effective teaching.  Diversity issues are discussed along with strategies and assessments for success. This helps teachers to continue child-centered teaching to build students’ confidence. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412940993 (pb). 9781412940986 (hc),

 Doubling Student Performance…And Finding the Resources to Do It is written by Allan R. Odden and Sarah J. Archibald. They provide examples from rural and urban schools of poverty that have found the resources to improve instruction. One chapter cites 10 well developed steps to double success; others discuss reducing class size and funding extra-help for students. I believe that school districts serious about success for all need to consider these ideas. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412969635 (pb). 9781412969628 (hc).

 The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop Learner Potential and Challenge Advanced Learners, 2nd edition was written by Carol Ann Tomlinson and others. It looks at four curriculums – the core, connection, practice and identity curriculums. After the element of curriculum design chapter there are chapters on each of these four curriculums. The emphasis is on social studies and science with references to the language arts. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412961318 (pb). 9781412961301 (hc).

Bullying

 Responding to the Culture of Bullying & Disrespect: New Perspectives on Collaboration, Compassion, and Responsibility, 2nd ed., written by Marie-Nathalie Beaudoin and Maureen Taylor, provides activities, forms, summaries in each chapter and examples of class discussions. Part II provides success stories as well as working with individuals-both the suffering student and the student doing the bullying. The Brain and Behaviors chapter deals with emotions and helping students understand how to change. A good book. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412968546 (pb).

 Understanding Girl Bullying and What to Do About It: Strategies to Help Heal the Divide was written by college professors Julaine Field, Jered B. Kolbert, Laura M. Crothers and Tammy L. Hughes. It has a 10-sessions curriculum for small groups, forms and checklists, considers classroom dynamics and provides suggestions for working with parents. This book is written for school counselors and principals who guide teachers. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412964883 (pb). Kindle ed. available.

Brain Theory

 Frank McNeil has written the latest research in Learning with the Brain in Mind. The first two chapters, “Seeing inside the brain” and “A journey round the brain”, provide information on the significant methods used to understand how the brain is functioning including “Babylabs” with geodesic brain hats. Chapter 3 discusses attention and 4 focuses on the importance of emotions. The last two chapters deal with memory, the social brain and plasticity. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412945264 (pb). 9781412945257 (hc).

 Head Case: How I Almost Lost My Mind Trying to Understand My Brain was written by Dennis Cass, a Minneapolis author. It was interesting to have him cite places in my home town as he sought advice about his brain. He does a nice job explaining the parts of the brain and their functions. If you are doing a paper on the brain you will find this helpful, but regular classroom teachers probably will want to focus on teaching instructions. Harper Perennial, 2008. 978-0060594732 (pb). 978-0374134525 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

Schools, Family and Community Partnership

 What Successful Schools Do to Involve Families: 53 Partnership Strategies by Neal Glasgow and Paula Jameson Whitney provide researched strategies that go beyond traditional communications with families. There is a chapter on non-parental caregivers, students with special needs, poverty, and parents. All grade levels are considered.  Strategies begin with the research, continuing with applications for classrooms then precautions and possible pitfalls. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412956048 (pb). 9781412956031 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 School, Family, and Community Partnerships, Your Handbook for Action, 3rd edition, with CD-Rom was created by Joyce L. Epstein and others. The authors argue that one of the most important things a teacher can do is enlist the support of families and the community. Chapter one relates the research to two sharing stories from schools. Further chapters develop ideas for teaming, doing workshops and taking leadership roles. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412959025 (pb).

 Reading Strategies for Elementary Students with Learning Difficulties: Strategies for RTI, 2nd edition, is written by William Bender and Martha Larkin.  The authors cite brain research as they develop their points. There are reflective exercises that will guide thinking. Two chapters explain phonics, others on building vocabulary and strategies for gaining comprehension. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412960694 (pb). 9781412960687 (hc).

 No Limits to Literacy, written by Theresa Roberts, has helpful Preschool English Learners boxes that summarize the teaching principles that are explained in greater detail on the page. There are fun suggestions such as using different colored unifix cubes to represent sounds. Curriculum issues and family connections are addressed in different chapters. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412965644 (pb). 9781412965637 (hc).

 Promoting Reading for Pleasure in the Primary School by Michael Lockwood makes the case that if we don’t help students enjoy reading they won’t be lifelong readers. The British research, based on 4,000 students, provides page after page of case studies and shares teachers’ enthusiastic activities. There are suggestions for ages 5-12 with a chapter devoted to boys. The last chapter suggests books for 5-7, 7-9 and 9-11 year olds. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412929677 (pb). 9781412929660 (hc).

 Building the Reading Brain, PreK-3 was written by Pamela Nevills and Patricia Wolfe. This second edition is filled with recent research on the developing brain. Chapters are excellent – what happens in the brain when children read words, birth to age 3, preschool years, readers at risk, and more. The conclusion restates twelve points. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412963268 (pb). 9781412963251 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Best Practices for Teaching Reading: What Award-Winning Classroom Teachers Do is by Randi Stone with examples by elementary and secondary teachers across the country. There are 40 strategies covering all academic subjects and focusing on diverse needs. Chapter 2 presents “Ten Steps to Great Readers,” although brief has excellent ideas. Other chapters cover visual arts, reading kinesthetically, autism issues and differentiating instruction. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412924597 (pb). 9781412924580 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Improving Literacy Instruction with Classroom Research by Theresa A. Deeney teaches the steps for classroom research, beginning with being a good observer, collecting data and keeping a journal of reflections. It provides research on each of five core skills in reading literacy, plus many examples of teacher research projects. There are many charts, guidelines and tables. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412924580 (pb). 9781412940887 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 English Grammar Instruction That Works!: Developing Language Skills for All Learners written by Evelyn and Andrew Rothstein provides K-12 activities to develop a deep understanding of our language. Parts of speech, syntax and semantics, roots of words and more are presented for teachers’ review with teaching ideas. Each chapter provides Internet sites. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412940887 (pb). 9781412959483 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction, edited by Bob Algozzine, Dorothy J. O’Shea and Festus E. Obiakor, deals with all areas of reading comprehension with multi-cultural literature themes. Tables summarize paragraphs and numerous stories of students emphasize important points. The 7 chapters cover all areas of literacy development. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957748 (pb). 9781412957731 (hc). Kindle ed. available.

 Writing Instruction for English Learners: A Focus on Genre by Eugenia Mora-Flores helps teachers understand the needs of English language learners. Students are taught to plan, write, revise, sharing and editing once again before producing a final draft. There are many visuals and examples. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412957298 (pb). 9781412957281 (hc).

 Marc Levitt, author of Putting Everyday Life on the Page: Inspiring Students to Write Grades 2-7, provides strong writing prompts and examples. Chapters develop ideas for teaching metaphors, developing character, and writing across all curriculum and teaching grammar. This light-hearted book gives suggestions for games while teaching important principles of writing. Corwin/Sage, 2009. 9781412965323 (pb). 9781412965316 (hc).

Previous Book Reviews  

• The Advisory Book by Linda Crawford This is really quite an amazing book with its details on operating an advisoryprogram for the middle school age group although it has relevance as well to high school advisory programs. It establishes the rationale for advisory programs with research. Many schools have seen the wisdom of an advisory program for student growth and many have begun them but the truth of the matter is that few follow through with a genuine program. Many so-called advisory programs resemble homeroom programs. The power of this astonishing book is that Crawford says exactly what one must do to establish a working, effective advisory. She provides the exact words to use with students in establishing the program, handling common problems and developing the program. For example, she provides 170 activities in detail to use so that teachers are not stymied by what to do next. At the same time she encourages teachers to use their own words or to adapt her suggestions. The book also lists references, films, professional books, storybooks for students and steps to role-playing and planning with students. As one who has established advisory programs in several schools, this book is highly recommended.

• If Holden Caulfield Were in my Classroom: Inspiring Love, Creativity, and Intelligence in Middle School Kids by Bernie Schein is one of the most astonishing books on teaching that I have seen in my 50 years of reading education books. This absolutely remarkable teacher of middle school students brings out the real feelings and emotions of students to create authentic people and in the process a classroom of vitality and greater learning. This book will take you inside the lives of adolescents, their fears, hopes, jealousies, dreams and inner selves. He also uses class meeting, trials and the core curriculum as a progressive educator. Every teacher at every level would gain from this engaging, readable book.

• Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by john J. Ratey is excellent! I had so many post-it note in the first 100 pages that I gave up trying to note important quotes. It begins with the story of Naperville schools that began a zero hour physical education class that focused on fitness. Students’ health data was first put into a computer then they were given targets for health. Students in this fitness program, PE4life, significantly improved their academic scores. While many schools are eliminating PE to spend more time on academics this district has found physical education is important to reach the “No Child Left Behind” goal.

•Teaching the Digital Generation: No more Cookie-Cutter High Schools, written by Kelly, McCain and Jukes begins by describing what the new high school student brings with them in comparison to the TTWWADI attitude (That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It). Early in the book there is an extensive quote from Bill Gates beginning with “American’s high schools are obsolete…” Suggestions include more connection with the outside world, learning labs, self-directed learning and individualized instruction. This book could lead many schools into the next years for our youth.

• Teaching the Digital Generation: No more Cookie-Cutter High Schools, written by Kelly, McCain and Jukes begins by describing what the new high school student brings with them in comparison to the TTWWADI attitude (That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It). Early in the book there is an extensive quote from Bill Gates beginning with “American’s high schools are obsolete…” Suggestions include more connection with the outside world, learning labs, self-directed learning and individualized instruction. This book could lead many schools into the next years for our youth.

• Inspiring Elementary Learners: Nurturing the Whole Child in a Differentiated Classroom by Kryza, Duncan and Stephens is excellent! This would be an excellent text for a college classroom to discuss – growing lifelong learners, building community, reflective learning, choices, social skills, tiered lessons, jigsaws, stations and more.

• 12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action: Developing Executive Function of the Human Brain, the second edition from Caine, Caine, McClintic and Klimek, is divided into three parts: Relaxed Alertness, Orchestrated Immersion in Complex Experience, and Active Processing. If you haven’t followed the Caine’s work over the years this is the book you need. It is thoroughly based in research and easy to absorb.

• A Guide to Co-Teaching with Para-educators: Practical Tips for K-12 Educators by Nevin, Villa and Thousand provides examples, chapter summaries and reproducible forms. If you are lucky enough to work with a para-educator this will be helpful.

• Designing Professional Development for Change: A Guide for Improving Classroom Instruction by James Bellanca focuses on strategies that principals need to understand in order to have continued teacher growth to meet the needs of their students. Mentoring, classroom observations, exhibitions and annual goals are all part of the process.

• Interactive Learning Experiences: Increasing Student Engagement and Learning, 6-12, by David Smoker is full of great ideas. Experiences stimulate students’ multiple senses, are interesting and are reflected on, discussed, afterward. These are basic principles of brain-compatible learning. It discusses how to create classroom environments that support real experiences. There are simulations and more than 10 pages of reproducible handouts.

More Than100 Ways to Learner-Centered Literacy, second edition is written by Lipton and Hubble. Chapter titles include designing classroom environments, orchestrating student interactions, developing fluency, nurturing lifelong learners, and assessing growth. I will give this book to our school’s 3-8th special reading teacher.

The Literacy Coach’s Companion, PreK-3 by Mraz, Algozzine and Kissel provides coaches, if you are lucky enough to have such, a game plan to guide teachers for early reading strategies. There are guidelines for working with administration, parents and other teachers. Learning communities are suggested and examples of practice vignettes.

Building Strong School Cultures: A guide to leading change by Kruse and Seashore Louis will be helpful for principals. It deals with assessment, broadening the decision-making processes, re-organizing, and supporting continuous improvement.

The Reflective Educator’s Guide to Classroom Research: Learning to teach and teaching to learn through practitioner inquiry by Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey is a 2nd edition. You simply cannot be a good teacher unless you reflect on what is happening to your students. There are many, many interesting exercises designed to help a teacher reflect on their practices, along with discussions. The last chapter focuses on the benefits of sharing your experiences in professional areas and getting feedback.

Making Great Kids Greater: Easing the Burden of Being Gifted by Dorothy Sisk will be helpful to many. This book let’s us listen to students and teacher experiences and provides research with suggested strategies. Each chapter ends with a summary, “Read On” for further books and articles, “Log On” for websites and “Reflect On”. This provides valuable insights for the regulation class and gifted teachers.

Differentiated Instructional Management: Work Smarter, Not Harder by Chapman and King is written to provide ideas manage and design productive learning environments. It begins with a number of questionnaires to help teachers identify their own beliefs about students and their goals. Differentiated learning is the key to leaving no child behind. Differentiation is necessary to make learning interesting to our diverse learners.

Schools as Professional Learning Communities: Collaborative Activities and Strategies for Professional Development, 2nd ed. was written by Roberts and Pruitt. The first three chapters develop the rationale for the following six that explain fostering teamwork, study groups, classroom observation, collaborative approaches, professional portfolios and sustaining the community. Each chapter has a preview, a conclusion, a “Making It Work” section and final activities. This is filled with important ideas for leadership teams and principals, as well as college of education students.

Passionate Leadership in Education is edited by Davies and Brighouse. They explain how passionate, caring teachers change schools with their expectation that every child will reach his potential regardless of issues. “Leaders in schools today operate in challenging environments with results-driven accountability frameworks that can often conflict deeper educational values.” This book is full of insights to help your school maintain passion.

Working with Parents: A Guide for Education Professionals by Digman and Soan deals with working with dysfunctional families as “normal”. There are suggestions on how to listen to students’ speech for clues about family issues along with case studies. Chapters end with summaries, points for reflection and many useful websites.

Using Data to Improve Learning for All: A Collaborative Inquiry Approach edited by Nancy Love clearly states the goals of data driven education. Chapters focus on how to organize data teams and coaches then shares two stories of how this process changed schools.

Assessing English Language Learners: Bridges From Language Proficiency to Academic Achievement was written by Margo Gottlieb.This book will significantly aid teachers’ understanding of their learners and guide their strategies for success. There are many rubrics, charts, checklists, surveys and tools ready to be used. The reflections will foster thinking.

• Formative Assessment Strategies for Enhanced Learning in Science, K-8 is written by Elizabeth Hammerman. The seven chapters are filled with charts, rubrics, and checklists ready for your classroom. Formative assessment should be a daily process providing thoughtful insights for student learning.

A Teacher’s Guide to Multisensory Learning: Improving Literacy by Engaging the Senses is written by Lawrence Baines. Wonderful examples convince the reader that students will learn more. A Florida teacher took failing 9th graders to the top quartile using multi-sensory instruction.

Reading, Writing, & Inquiry in the Science to Improve Content Learning, Grades 6-12 by Chamberlain and Corby Crane will be useful for secondary science teachers who haven’t taught language arts. Language arts ideas are given for creative writing with science, using drawing, reflections, and graphic organizers. Language processes promotes science thinking.

Differentiating with Graphic Organizers: Tools to Foster Critical and Creative Thinking is written by Patti Drapeau. The first part discusses how graphic organizers promote achievement, then she describes 9 different ones with rubrics for feedback. Finally there are suggestions for creating your own organizers across all curriculum areas. Good visuals, very interesting!

Sustaining Extraordinary Student Achievement by Linda E. Reksten notates the success of five schools in California. The chapters focus on effective instruction, discipline, collaboration and the culture of high expectations. Each school’s story is based on site visits and interviews. Each school began with significant challenges and made excellent achievement.

Brain-Friendly for Developing Student Writing Skills, 2nd Ed. by Anne Hanson begins with principles of brain-compatible classrooms, explains 7 stages for writing and many pages of classroom examples. She provides guidance for generative thinking at all grade levels and across content areas.

Classroom Activators: More Than 100 Ways to Energize Learners, 2nd Ed. by Jerry Evanski has many fun ideas for kindergarten to adults. It appropriately begins with brain basics. There are ideas for energizing your classroom and students, helping students focus their attention and building community. This book will help teachers remember to use your voice, visuals around the room, music and circle games.

Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs by Ripley and Barrett uses 16 case studies focused on ages 11-19. It has practical suggestions for assessment, adapting the curriculum, working with parents and downloadable resources for special educators.

40 Engaging Brain-Based Tools for the Classroom written by Michael A. Scaddan, a principal in New Zealand is a compilation of his school’s techniques. He covers relaxation and breathing, themes and learning styles, multiple intelligences and goal setting, mind maps reflection and a lot more.

Inspiring Elementary Learners: Nurturing the Whole Child in a Differentiated Classroom by Kryza, Duncan and Stephens is excellent! This would be an excellent text for a college classroom to discuss – growing lifelong learners, building community, reflective learning, choices, social skills, tiered lessons, jigsaws, stations and more.

12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action: Developing Executive Function of the Human Brain, the second edition from Caine, Caine, McClintic and Klimek, is divided into three parts: Relaxed Alertness, Orchestrated Immersion in Complex Experience, and Active Processing. If you haven’t followed the Caine’s work over the years this is the book you need. It is thoroughly based in research and easy to absorb by James Bellanca focuses on strategies that principals need to understand in order to have continued teacher growth to meet the needs of their students. Mentoring, classroom observations, exhibitions and annual goals are all part of the process.

A Guide to Co-Teaching with Para-educators: Practical Tips for K-12 Educators by Nevin, Villa and Thousand provides examples, chapter summaries and reproducible forms. If you are lucky enough to work with a para-educator this will be helpful.

Interactive Learning Experiences: Increasing Student Engagement and Learning, 6-12, by David Smoker is full of great ideas. Experiences stimulate students’ multiple senses, are interesting and are reflected on, discussed, afterward. These are basic principles of brain-compatible learning. It discusses how to create classroom environments that support real experiences. There are simulations and more than 10 pages of reproducible handouts.

More Than100 Ways to Learner-Centered Literacy, 2nd edition is written by Lipton and Hubble. Chapter titles include designing classroom environments, orchestrating student interactions, developing fluency, nurturing lifelong learners, and assessing growth. I will give this book to our school’s 3-8th special reading teacher.

The Literacy Coach’s Companion, PreK-3 by Mraz, Algozzine and Kissel provides coaches, if you are lucky enough to have such, a game plan to guide teachers for early reading strategies. There are guidelines for working with administration, parents and other teachers. Learning communities are suggested and examples of practice vignettes.

Building Strong School Cultures: A guide to leading change by Kruse and Seashore Louis will be helpful for principals. It deals with assessment, broadening the decision-making processes, re-organizing, and supporting continuous improvement.

The Reflective Educator’s Guide to Classroom Research: Learning to teach and teaching to learn through practitioner inquiry by Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey is a 2nd edition. You simply cannot be a good teacher unless you reflect on what is happening to your students. There are many, many interesting exercises designed to help a teacher reflect on their practices, along with discussions. The last chapter focuses on the benefits of sharing your experiences in professional areas and getting feedback.

Making Great Kids Greater: Easing the Burden of Being Gifted by Dorothy Sisk will be helpful to many. This book let’s us listen to students and teacher experiences and provides research with suggested strategies. Each chapter ends with a summary, “Read On” for further books and articles, “Log On” for websites and “Reflect On”. This provides valuable insights for the regulation class and gifted teachers.

Differentiated Instructional Management: Work Smarter, Not Harder by Chapman and King is written to provide ideas manage and design productive learning environments. It begins with a number of questionnaires to help teachers identify their own beliefs about students and their goals. Differentiated learning is the key to leaving no child behind. Differentiation is necessary to make learning interesting to our diverse learners.

Reading, Writing, & Inquiry in the Science Classroom, Grades 6-12 by Chamberlain and Crane is an important book for high school teachers.

Building Emotional Intelligence: Techniques to Cultivate Inner Strength in Children by Linda Lantieri has six chapters and a list of where to get resources. Basics of calming and relaxation are covered then chapters focus on 5-7 year olds, 8-11 and finally 12 year olds. The book is designed for parents but would be an excellent resource for teachers.

In Our School: Building Community in Elementary Schools by Karen Casto and Jennifer Audley is a new publication by Responsive Classroom/NE Foundation for Children. Articles in the five sections depict schools across the US. Many chapters represent older responsive classroom ideas such as creating school-wide rules and morning announcement. New interesting ideas are in chapters on “teaching recess” and “bus communities”. Excellent.

•The Reflective Educator’s Guide to Professional Development: Coaching Inquiry-Oriented Learning Communities is written by Nancy Fichtman Dana and Diane Yendol-Hoppey. Professional Learning Communities (PLC) are ongoing weekly, preferably, experiences within schools. It is the process of articulating areas to study, collecting data and reflecting. The seven chapters gently guide you through the entire process. Examples cover all grade levels. This is an important resource for guiding your school’s improvement goals.

•Designing & Assessing Educational Objectives: Applying the New Taxonomy by Robert Marzano and John Kendall begins with “A New Perspective on Educational Objectives”. The new taxonomy has six levels with level 4 being utilization, 5 is metacognition regarding self monitoring, and 6 labeled “self-system thinking.” There are many helpful charts illustrating concepts are all grade levels. If you are working to move your students beyond basic information and comprehension this is a good choice.

•The Autism Inclusion Toolkit by Maggie Bowen and Lynn Plimley comes with a PowerPoint CD-ROM for presentations and handouts. It begins with two questionnaires for teachers. Each chapter has brief case studies at all levels, extension activities and further resources. With the increasing number of children diagnosed with some level of autism it is important to raise our awareness of issues. I intend to ask my library to increase its resources.

•The Cluster Grouping Handbook: How to Challenge Gifted Students and Improve Achievement for All is written by Susan Winebrenner and Dina Brulles. Focusing on K-8 schools the authors present forms, along with the CD-Rom, to help parents and teachers identify gifted students and their specific needs. Too many gifted students are bored with regular classroom activities. Each child needs to be able to learn at the appropriate level. Pretests, differentiated activities and independent projects are necessary for gifted students. This book will guide teachers toward increased flexibility. There are a wealth of ideas, charts, and examples. Excellently formatted.

•The Caring Teacher’s Guide to Discipline: Helping Students Learn Self-Control, Responsibility, and Respect, K-6 is an excellent book written by Marilyn Gootman. It begins with establishing a caring community that is necessary for learning and continues to develop ideas about class meetings, expectations, praise, misbehaviors and bullying. It is well written and guides teachers in this crucial area of social-emotional learning.

•Authors Thombs, Gillis and Canestrari have written Using WebQuests in the Social Studies Classroom: A Culturally Responsive Approach. Chapter one asks teachers to evaluate how their teaching is validating, comprehensive, multidimensional, empowering, transformative and emancipatory. This, they believe, is what our non-white students need to become powerful citizens. In addition to many resources there are sample rubrics and design patterns. The use of technology will be the classroom of the future. This book provides excellent guidance.

•Thinking Strategies for Science: Grades 5-12 (2nd edition), written by Sally Berman, has many reproducibles that support the activities. The sample activities such as think-pair-share, Venn diagrams, matrix, jigsaw, storyboards, and more are illustrations transferable to all content. If you need ideas to expand your techniques this would be valuable in your library.

•English for Gifted and Talented Students by Geoff Dean focused on the ages 11-18 and has 357 book suggestions, information sheets and a CD-Rom. So much attention is focused on the struggling students, it increases the importance this new book a valuable guide for teaching those students far above the norm. A large part of this book focuses on identifying these students, then provides suggestions for personalizing the curriculum.

•Every Child Can Learn: Using Learning Tools and play to help children with developmental delay is written by Stroh, Robinson and Proctor. This focuses on the very young child to work on specific learning procedures. This book is a resource for preschool special education teachers.

•30 Reflective Staff Development Exercises for Educators by Stephan Kaagan emphasizies the importance of personal reflective thinking that is not necessarily part of their job. We are the sum of our experiences and as we understand those experiences we gain insights. These exercises are done via staff development to yield self-growth. Activities include “What to Keep, What Not to Keep”, “Patchwork Perspectives” and “Vision Sketch”. Although these are to be experienced and debriefed with colleagues but they could also be done with friends.

•Brain Rules:12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School by John Medina brings together many new studies. “Vision trumps all other senses” he explains as he references the scientific studies.

•Your Brain on Cubs: Inside the Heads of Players and Fans, edited by Dan Gordon, provides insights on the ½ second a batter has before swinging. It discusses handedness, neurological enhancement. This is for your baseball crazy folks.

•The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain that helps readers understand how a workout routine maximizes neuron growth, sharpens cognition and improves moods.

•Welcome to Your Brain by Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang. Illustrations, side bars and anecdotes provide a guide to the “brain’s quirky machinery”.

•Brain-Friendly Study Strategies: grades 2-8 by Schwed and Melichar-Utter is a guide for teachers. After an overview of brain functioning in learning, and learning styles the authors chapters focus on multiple intelligences to explain strategies. Easy to follow. This is a good resource for beginning whole-brain teachers.

•The Power of Visual Imagery: A reading comprehension program for students with reading difficulties by Karen Kelly is a 90 page resource to help teachers understand how to use visual imagery. After a chapter on reading difficulties the author explains the research and use of imagery. The remaining four chapters provide exercises and resource materials. This is an important book.

•Visual Knowing by Donovan Walling is focused on connecting art and ideas across the secondary curriculum. Each of its 15 chapters (on competition, history, math, technology, etc.) has an introduction, thinking questions and very helpful online sites.

•Dealing with Feeling by Tina Rae is an excellent resource for teachers of 1-14 year olds. Studies reveal that students who learn feeling lessons are more successful in academics. This book provides 40 lessons complete with a CD-Rom that has posters and pages to reprint. For most teachers, who have little background in teaching the personal intelligences, this will be an important guide.

•Promoting Emotional and Social Development in Schools: A Practical Guide by Blake, Bird and Gerlach seeks to change the whole school. There are guidelines for helping parents and community understand the importance of social/emotional development. Research, case studies and activities are included.

•The Hungry Brain by Susan Archibald Marcus begins by providing basic nutrition information. Then, at the end of each chapter, there are pages and pages of activities for primary, intermediate, middle school and high school students. The chapters cove malnutrition, fats, sugar, food allergies and exercise. Excellent.

•Twelve Brain Principles by Brian M. Pete and Robin J. Fogarty is focused on the research on Caine and Caine. If you don’t have this type of book already this is clearly written. Each chapter begins with a list of synonyms for important words. For instance, “Learning is enhanced by challenge and inhibited by threat.” Then there is a brief, but clear discussion of the principle. Not new, but perfectly fine.

•Multiple Intelligence for Differentiated Learning is written by R. Bruce Williams. Chapters focus on the theory, setting the stage for active engagement, making constructivist connections with curriculum and standards, instructional strategies and assessment.

•Catch a Falling Reader by Connie Hebert has 40 short, short chapters backed with ideas. Instead of “read the chapter” try “Stop reading when you find out…” Give students a purpose and a challenge. I marked many post-it notes for great suggestions.

•Joyful Learning: Active and Collaborative Learning in Inclusive Classrooms by Alice Udvari and Paula Kluth is as a co-planning tool for special education teachers and classroom teachers. It has many ideas that all classrooms should use regardless of inclusion. “Pass the Compliment”, “Two Truths and A Lie”, paper bag interviews and fishbowl activities are examples.

•Cultivating the Learner-Centered Classroom: From Theory to Practice by Tollefson and Osborn deals with changing the behaviors of teachers in their classrooms. Chapters focus on understanding students, planning instruction and assessing growth. Each chapter provides a summary that I would suggest is read before the chapter to orient the mind. Learners do better when the classroom is focused on their specific styles and needs.

•The School as a Home for the Mind by Arthur Costa is an important book to guide all schools toward excellence. Mindful practices in the classroom depend on a teacher’s understanding of thinking, planning appropriate curriculum focused on thinking, and self-reflection. This book has the potential of significantly changing the way teachers and school function. It would be a valuable book for a whole school discussion—teachers and parents.

•Integrating Curricula with Multiple Intelligences: Teams, Themes & Threads by Robin Fogarty and Judy Stoehr will be useful if you are not familiar with MI and themes. After the introduction it has good activities for teams, a review of how to develop themes and how to put it all together. This would be useful for many teachers.

•Developing Emotional Literacy with Teenage Boys by Tina Rae and Lisa Pederson is meant for counselors and facilitators. It starts by making a case for emotional difficulties of boys and young men. It is organized into 12 sessions beginning with “Identity” and including friendships, feelings, drugs, crime, and goals. Each session has activities and guidance for circle talks.

•Promoting Emotional and Social Development in Schools by Blake, Bird and Gerlach begins with an overview of research. The authors recommend a whole-school commitment and provide suggestions for promoting development with activities at all levels and involving parents.

•Leading Student-Centered Discussion by Hale and City is focused on using textbooks in a secondary school. The why and how of becoming a facilitator rather than a lecturer is clear and concise. There are chapters for helping students learn their new roles and, in the process, gain skills and greater learning. Valuable.

•Building an Intentional School Culture by Elbot and Fulton is directed on principals or others in leadership positions. There are many exercises that would guide a school community to clarify their goals and establish a path towards greater success.

•The Hungry Brain, by Susan Archibald Marcus begins by providing basic nutrition information. Then, at the end of each chapter, there are pages and pages of activities for primary, intermediate, middle school and high school students. The chapters cove malnutrition, fats, sugar, food allergies and exercise. Excellent.

•Twelve Brain Principles by Brian M. Pete and Robin J. Fogarty is focused on the research on Caine and Caine. If you don’t have this type of book already this is clearly written. Each chapter begins with a list of synonyms for important words. For instance, “Learning is enhanced by challenge and inhibited by threat.”Then there is a brief, but clear discussion of the principle. Not new, but perfectly fine.

•Multiple Intelligence for Differentiated Learning is written by R. Bruce Williams. Chapters focus on the theory, setting the stage for active engagement, making constructivist connections with curriculum and standards, instructional strategies and assessment.

•Catch a Falling Reader by Connie Hebert has 40 short, short chapters backed with ideas. Instead of  “read the chapter” try “Stop reading when you find out…” Give students a purpose and a challenge.  I marked many post-it notes for great suggestions.

•Joyful Learning: Active and Collaborative Learning in Inclusive Classrooms by Alice Udvari and Paula Kluth is as a co-planning tool for special education teachers and classroom teachers. It has many ideas that all classrooms should use regardless of inclusion. “Pass the Compliment”, “Two Truths and A Lie”, paper bag interviews and fishbowl activities are examples.

•Integrating Curricula with Multiple Intelligences: Teams, Themes & Threads by Robin Fogarty and Judy Stoehr will be useful if you are not familiar with MI and themes. After the introduction it has good activities for teams, a review of how to develop themes and how to put it all together. This would be useful for many teachers.

•Developing Emotional Literacy with Teenage Boys by Tina Rae and Lisa Pederson is meant for counselors and facilitators. It starts by making a case for emotional difficulties of boys and young men. It is organized into 12 sessions beginning with “Identity”and including friendships, feelings, drugs, crime, and goals. Each session has activities and guidance for circle talks.

•Promoting Emotional and Social Development in Schools by Blake, Bird and Gerlach begins with an overview of research. The authors recommend a whole-school commitment and provide suggestions for promoting development with activities at all levels and involving parents.

•Brain-Friendly Study Strategies Grades 2-8 by Schwed and Melichar-Utter uses the Multiple Intelligences as a framework. Be-Boppin’the Brain provides ways to use music in all academic areas. Seeing Your Thoughts provides visual-spatial activities. If you are new to these ideas this book will get you started to fly on your own later. After an overview of brain functioning in learning, and learning styles the authors chapters focus on multiple intelligences to explain strategies. Easy to follow. This is a good resource for beginning whole-brain teachers.

•Building an Intentional School Culture by Elbot and Fulton is directed on principals or others in leadership positions. There are many exercises that would guide a school community to clarify their goals and establish a path towards greater success.

•The Power of Visual Imagery: A reading comprehension program for students with reading difficulties by Karen Kelly is a 90 page resource to help teachers understand how to use visual imagery. After a chapter on reading difficulties the author explains the research and use of imagery. The remaining four chapters provide exercises and resource materials. This is an important book.

•Visual Knowing by Donovan Walling is focused on connecting art and ideas across the secondary curriculum. Each of its 15 chapters (on competition, history, math, technology, etc.) has an introduction, thinking questions and very helpful online sites.

•Dealing with Feeling by Tina Rae is an excellent resource for teachers of 1-14 year olds. Studies reveal that students who learn feeling lessons are more successful in academics. This book provides 40 lessons complete with a CD-Rom that has posters and pages to reprint. For most teachers, who have little background in teaching the personal intelligences, this will be an important guide.

•Cultivating the Learner-Centered Classroom: from theory to practice by Tollefson and Osborn deals with changing the behaviors of teachers in their classrooms. Chapters focus on understanding students, planning instruction and assessing growth. Each chapter provides a summary that I would suggest is read before the chapter to orient the mind. Learners do better when the classroom is focused on their specific styles and needs.

•The School as a Home for the Mind by Arthur Costa is an important book to guide all schools toward excellence. Mindful practices in the classroom depend on a teacher’s understanding of thinking, planning appropriate curriculum focused on thinking, and self-reflection. This book has the potential of significantly changing the way teachers and school function. It would be a valuable book for a whole school discussion—teachers and parents.

•Leading Student-Centered Discussion by Hale and City is focused on using textbooks in a secondary school. The why and how of becoming a facilitator rather than a lecturer is clear and concise. There are chapters for helping students learn their new roles and, in the process, gain skills and greater learning. Valuable.

•Integrating Curricula with Multiple Intelligences: Teams, Themes & Threads by Robin Fogarty and Judy Stoehr will be useful if you are not familiar with MI and themes. After the introduction it has good activities for teams, a review of how to develop themes and how to put it all together. This would be useful for many teachers.

•Writing Lessons for Students (ages) 6-18 is edited by Jenny Traig. This resource starts with ideas for stories, letters and a short play about a pet, real or imaginary and continues with a structure to develop a mystery. There are persuasion activities, special ideas for character development, homonyms, essay forms, writing tall tales and more. Many ideas are multi-sessions.

•A Whole New Mind: Why Right-brainers Will Rule the Future by Daniel Pink is an extremely important book. In this decade of testing nurturing the right hemisphere has been limited. Logical sequential left hemisphere thinking will be done more and more by technology. The “Information Age” where knowledge is power is changing to the “Conceptual Age” that values creators and empathizers. Chapters explain how to nurture the right brain.

•Deeper Learning: 7 Powerful Strategies for In-Depth and Longer-Lasting Learning by Eric Jensen and LeAnn Nickelsen. Begins with numerous ways to activate prior knowledge, gives directions for summarizing information, team-building, and more. In the “processing with a purpose”
chapter there are many reproducible student pages. There are so many ideas for all ages and subjects! This is definitely a book for your desk and will take some time to peruse it this summer.

•Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. A step-by-step guide for educators by Roger Pierangelo and George Giuliani should be in your school library. The authors explain the characteristics and types of ASD, evaluate the effectiveness of programs, than give ideas to help parents and preschoolers. They discuss instructional approaches, classroom management, inclusion, teaching social skills, discipline and more.

•Positive Behavior Strategies to Support Children and Young People with Autism by Martin Hanbury provides 100 pages of theory and practical strategies. There are useful tables, charts and diagrams as well as ideas for families. The case studies are helpful and each chapter ends with a summary of key points.

•The Developing Brain: Birth to Age Eight by Marilee Sprenger, a familiar name in brain writing. Chapters explain development year by year along with checklists. There are interesting “Brain Boxes” throughout each chapter as well as brain drawings with parts labeled. They suggest activities for parents and daycare givers.

•Dealing with Feeling by Tina Rae focused on ages 7-14 and includes a CD Rom to aid with printing activity sheets. It includes 40 interesting topics each with a nine-step process. After a warm-up activity and Circle Time a story is read to the group. Then comes questions, act it out, activity sheets self-reflection and home tasks.

•Using their Brains in Science: Ideas for Children Aged 5-14 by Helen Ward. This begins by explaining the brain, memory, motivation and learning. The detective chapter explains how to set up experiments and record data. Other chapters use role playing, how to develop scientific vocabulary and the use of writing and drawing to understand processes.

•Science Formative Assessment: 75 Practical Strategies for Linking Assessment, Instruction, and Learning by Page Keeley. The technique, Formative Assessment Classroom Techniques (FACTs). This process helps develop metacognition. The strategies which develop thinking are diverse and can be used in other subjects.

•Assessment-Centered Teaching: A Reflective Practice by Kathryn DiRanna and others was developed through NSF funding. The 10 chapters develop ideas of pre-think, prepare, reflect analyze patterns and math assessments. Flow charts aid the words, showing criteria for scoring student work. There is an accompanying CD.